sam lasman

“A watershed event for the English-speaking world”

The rest of the The Girl From Andros run is now sold out, but if you get on the waitlist and show up to the theater early, there’s a good chance we’ll find  you a seat!

“Michael is a wonderful translator, with a keen ear for musicality and a profound understanding of translation theories and practices. This production is a watershed event for the English-speaking world.” –Prof. Angela Capodivacca, Yale University

Showtimes are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., with a 2 p.m. matinee on Saturday. Get on the waitlist now!

     

Machiavelli play premieres at Yale!

You read that correctly. Half a millenium after philosopher and dramatist Niccolò Machiavelli wrote his first play, its first-ever translation for the English stage will debut at Yale University. This hilarious comedy is directed by Sam Lasman, managed by Kate Carter, and produced by Allison Hadley with the generous support of the Shakespeare at Yale Festival and the Department of Italian Language and Literature.

When: Thursday, Friday, Saturday at 8 p.m. with a matinee Saturday at 2 p.m.
Where: The Crescent Underground Theatre in Morse-Stiles residential colleges
Tickets: Free! Reserve yours here.

From the Shakespeare at Yale events booklet:

“You are witnessing a historic moment — the first English translation and performance of Machiavelli’s Andria. One of the first comedies represented in the early modern world, Terence’s Andria was considered a play par excellence. Machiavelli wrote two adaptations of Andria in the Tuscan vernacular between 1504–5 and 1514. We use the term “adaptation” because Machiavelli’s Andria does not revolve around the question of merely translating terms and concepts. By deciding when to intervene and change the text and when not to, Machiavelli reflected on history and its ability to be translated through time and language. Notably, the play depicts the struggle between an ancient and a new world order through the conflict between an older father and his son. The witty and cunning servant, David (representing Machiavelli), plays a major role. David manages to foil the older man’s plans and ensure victory for his son.”